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Tuesday, November 6, 2012

Photographer versus Fauxtographer (AKA: GWC)


Many photographers out there have a huge educational background behind them. Some are self taught and some have a combination of both. I'm a combination of education, practical experience and self taught. I did some time as an assistant with a pro shooter who took the time to teach me a lot of what I didn't know.

Then there are what has become known as Fauxtographers. We may also call them GWC (Guy or Girl With Camera).

Fauxtographers/GWCs' are the ones who without the slightest bit of experience and/or education, think now that they own a DSLR makes them Photographers. The claim their poor, blown out highlights, unfocused crap as their "style" and feel that since somebody told them how great they were, they don't feel the need to actually learn how to shoot properly. Their usual method is what we call "Spray and Pray", which is a way of shooting many images in a short time, thinking that a few will turn out to be good. Really that only works for sports and high speed action.

Another great indicator of a Fauxtographer/GWC is when they ask for an opinion/feedback from an experienced shooter, they never take the criticism and advice without an excuse, usually being something along the lines of the image was what they intended or "Thats my style". There is rarely a change in their shooting habits and when its recommended to them that they take a few classes or go to seminars they almost always have an excuse as to why they cant or wont do it.

(I'm just going to refer to these people as GWCs' from here as you know the kind of people I'm referring to now)

I'm happy to say that I no longer get these GWCs' offering to assist me for free in my studio because I won't educate somebody for free. I'm happy to help the community in any way I can (within reason) but teaching a GWC for free isn't on my list. If I use an assistant, they will be experienced and know their way around a studio. I will also PAY an experienced assistant.

One GWC who was rather insistent about "helping" me for free in my studio finally shut up when I said: "What would you do if I told you the following: I need a 1200 RX up above with my big octa and a Skyport set to channel 1. At 45 degrees right and about 12 feet back I need a 1200 RX with a Varistar on a C-Stand and a Skyport set to channel 2. Set the auto-poles at the proper distance and hang my black commando cloth background, then make sure its clean of any specks. Do you have any idea what I'm talking about?"

"No".

"Then how exactly is it you think you can help me?"

"I can do grunt work."

"Thats exactly what an assistant does and thats what I just described to you. If you have no education behind you and no experience, you should be paying me to teach you."

"I dont think so."

"Neither do I. Please dont bother me again."

I like to think of GWCs' as a filter for the kind of clients that wouldn't deal with professionals in the first place. We've all encountered potential clients who think they have somebody who will do it for far cheaper, or for free or whatever. They have no idea that they'll be ending up with an inferior product and when its explained to them they wont hear any of it.

Those kinds of people will never come back that professional and say "you were right". Let the GWC's have them.

Lets also not forget the compositional issues- That plastic kit lens always gives a great affect when the GWC gets up in the face of the model for that distorted look. Perspective distortion is something they have never heard, and when its explained to them, their usual excuse is that they cant afford such expensive lenses so they make do with what they have.

Rarely does a GWC want to pay for any form of education so they can truly become photographers. They think that since their friends/family have told them just how great they are that they're well along their way.

Again, I'm happy to help the community in any reasonable way I can. Teaching a GWC for free is not one of them nor will I coddle an individual who asks for my feedback. If there is something wrong with an image that I am asked to critique I will tell the individual what I think but I will also offer solutions or how to find them.

Patting an aspiring shooter on the head and treating them like a fragile child is not my style and never will be.

Friday, October 19, 2012

Leica and my great fortune.

In the past few months, I have been incredibly fortunate to have had Leica loan me three of their camera systems. (All external links are at the bottom of this entry)

First, I had their X2 compact camera (16.5 MP APS-C CMOS) with a 24mm f2.8 Elmarit (35mm Equivalent) old fashioned zoom (Use your feet!).

During the middle of summer I had the X2 and was having a blast with it. Of course there are limitations when using a fixed focal length but the challenge is in working with it, seeing possibilities, not obstacles. I will say one thing. manually focusing it was a bit of a challenge. Once I got used to how it worked and the subtleties all went well. I didn't need to manually focus very often so it was no big deal. I used this one outside of my studio, in the field so to speak.

I think I may purchase one by the end of the year.

Next came the Leica M9-P. It has an 18 MP full frame CCD imaging sensor (Sorry, no live view) and an almost perfect physical match to the earlier "M" models from the film days. Its a rangefinder, the original "mirrorless" design. One has to be mindful of whats in the viewfinder and within the frame lines shown in order to be sure of composition. Manual focus as well. One part that always makes me laugh- There is no "P" mode on the shutter speed dial. Fully manual exposure control or aperture priority. Thats it. Center weighted metering only. Minimalist design and execution, enabling the creative person behind it to truly use their mind and eye. No "Spray and Pray" here.

I used the M9-P in and outside of my studio and the camera easily became an extension of my eye. It also has a very intuitive menu system and was easily used in any situation that presented itself.

The lenses that came with it were the Summarit-M 35mm f2.5 (Medium Wide Angle) and the APO-Summicron-M 75mm f2 ASPH medium telephoto. I think its hilarious that some Leica aficionados turn their noses up at the 35mm Summarit because its "too slow", too small, too this too that. All I know is that the lens did exactly what I expected of it and the image quality was also as expected. Nothing short of fantastic. The 35mm was used primarily outdoors for various images. As many of you may know, two of my favorite subjects are cars and motorcycles which this lens was perfectly suited for.

I got a little laugh from the thought that some camera owners who refer to themselves as "photographers" would have no idea what to do with a camera like the M9-P.

I want one.

Lastly comes the S2.

The Leica S2 is in my opinion, the finest medium format digital camera on the market. Why? Because of its versatility and usability. Its not only fantastic in a studio environment, but also out in the world. Both the S2 body and the S lenses are weather sealed in order to withstand difficult weather conditions. The level of thoughtfulness that has gone into the design and execution of this camera is amazing. I didn't have to read the instruction manual in order to figure it out, and the controls and menus are about as intuitive as it can get.

By the very nature of the sensor, the high iso settings available to standard and pro level DSLRs' are impossible, so one falls back to the "old" skill set of working within the limitations of the environment and creatively overcoming any potential issues related to them.

Initially, what surprised me the most was the weight. The S2 with the "standard" 70mm lens felt like it weighed just about the same as my Nikon D3x with the 24-70 f2.8 attached. Physically it was about the same as well. I never felt like I had to put it down in order to give my hands a rest. Comparing the weight with the Hasselblad H3d and H4d (I've used both) the Leica S2 is a feather. The other thing I noticed that unlike both Hasselblads' I used, the S2 never required a "reboot". The S2 performed flawlessly in every way.

Image quality was everything I expected from a Leica product. On rare occasions I had to manually focus, depending on the subject matter but nobody ever said autofocus was perfect.

Yes, I want one. Badly. I've been bitten by the bug.

Find me on Facebook to see some of the images I shot with the S2.

The Leica S2 has since been replaced by the "S", a more updated version that looks even better than the S2.

My eternal gratitude goes out to Leica for the use of their amazing equipment.

Leica links:

Leica X2

Leica M9 and M9-P

Leica S System


Monday, June 18, 2012

2012 Mods Vs Rockers event here in Chicago!

Running from the evening of Friday June 15 and ending the night of Saturday June 16 was the annual Mods vs Rockers motorcycle event here in Chicago. I'm posting just a small selection of what I shot because frankly, thats all I have time for right now. Attended by all kinds of riders on the motorcycles and scooters makes for an amazing display of new and old technology, stock and custom work and a great cross section of the culture!

Soon images will be available for sale so please keep in touch! Send me an email if you'd like to get the announcement of the new site going live soon!

I know you may find my watermark annoying but unfortunately some people refuse to respect an artists hard work. You still get the idea of the image and images purchased from me do not have the watermark. If you'd like to post my images elsewhere please ask first.












Friday, February 24, 2012

The perfect(?) tripod head and amazing customer service.

Recently I dropped a rather hefty sum of money (Comparatively speaking) on a Gitzo Traveller carbon fiber tripod. Why? Simply put- Weight. I wanted to carry less.

Since there was no lightweight ball head in Gitzo's lineup that I was really impressed by, I began my search for what I considered to be the perfect tripod head for me. I already had a quick release system, made by Novoflex. Their plate, which is round and about the same circumference as a US Quarter Dollar and about as thick as two stacked together (Or a couple of Euros') is part of an extremely secure system. I'm still not sure if I'm going to stick with the mount, as I may finally decide on an "Arca-Swiss" type mount and plate. Yes, this is a little taste of hell.

A number of weeks ago I met a fellow shooter who had a very unique tripod head. Made from finely milled aircraft aluminum, black, lightweight and seriously cool looking (To me). It was made by a  company called Acratech, out of Pomona, California (Links at end of this posting). This thing looked otherworldly in its visual style, like out of an old black and white Sci-Fi movie. Better yet, the head weighed around one pound and was rated to hold 25 POUNDS! Yes, 25.

I ordered their "Ultimate Ballhead" from their website (They have no dealers in Illinois.) and it arrived in a timely manner thanks to UPS. I took it out of the box, mounted the quick release, then mounted it all on the tripod. Next, I mounted my D3 with the 24-70 f2.8 on it which weighs just short of 6 pounds and locked the head. In order to move the camera with the head locked, it would take a great deal of effort to move the camera. In other words, its held securely without a doubt.

I was finally able to get out and test it one evening and I discovered something. The controls were on the right. Why is that a problem? I use my right hand to control/move the camera. That meant that I'd have to hold the camera with my left hand and work the tripod controls with my right (Awkward!). The next day I sent an email to Acratech to inquire about the same tripod with left-handed controls. They had stopped making that particular model (Left handed) but they had the parts to assemble one for me so while it would take a few days, they were happy to do so, so I should let them know what I wanted to do. Wow. Very nice of them, don't you agree? I then looked at their other heads on their site and realized that there was another model The GV2) that would suit my needs even better so I sent another email asking if I could just exchange the original for the the other, and pay for the difference. I was assured that it was no problem at all and was told how much the difference would be.

All the way though, the people at Acratech were pleasant, fun to talk to and highly professional. They have a comprehensive lineup of products to help out anybody interested in their exemplarily level of quality.

I have the GV2 head now and I can't wait to actually use it.

Here are the relevant links: